Human Development, Political Science & Sociology

James A. Evans

Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Chicago

773-834-3612

His work explores how social and technical institutions shape knowledge—science, scholarship, law, news, religion—and how these understandings reshape the social and technical world. Evans is particularly interested in the relation of markets to science and knowledge more broadly. He has studied how industry collaboration shapes the ethos, secrecy and organization of academic science; the web of individuals and institutions that produce innovations; and markets for ideas and their creators. Evans has also examined the impact of the Internet on knowledge in society.  His work uses natural language processing, the analysis of social and semantic networks, statistical modeling, and field-based observation and interviews.


John Mark Hansen

The Charles L. Hutchinson Distinguished Service Professor in the department of political science and the College

(773) 702-5476

Hansen, whose research has focused on interest groups, citizen activism and public opinion, is the author of two books, Mobilization, Participation and Democracy in America (1993) with Steven Rosenstone and Gaining Access: Congress and the Farm Lobby, 1919-1981 (1991).  Hansen's current research focuses on public opinion, public budgeting and politicians' inferences from the outcomes of elections.


Guanglei Hong

Associate Professor, Department of Comparative Human Development

http://home.uchicago.edu/~ghong

Professor Hong has focused her research on developing causal inference theories and methods for evaluating educational policies and instructional programs in multi-level, longitudinal settings. Her work addresses issues including (1) how to conceptualize and evaluate the causal effects of educational treatments when students’ responses to alternative treatments depend on various features of the organizational settings, (2) how to adjust for selection bias in estimating the effects of concurrent multi-valued educational treatments, (3) how to study instruction as time-varying treatments for students, and (4) how to conceptualize and analyze the causal mediation mechanisms in evaluating educational interventions.


Stephen Raudenbush

Lewis Sebring Distinguished Service Professor
Department of Sociology

Tel: (773) 834-1904

He is a leading scholar on quantitative methods for studying child and youth development within social setting such as classrooms, schools, and neighborhoods. He is best known for his work on developing hierarchical linear modes, with broad applications in the design and analysis of longitudinal and multilevel research. Raudenbush has been the Scientific Director of the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, an ambitious study of how family, neighborhood and school settings shape the academic learning, social development, mental health and exposure to violence of children growing up in Chicago. He is currently studying the impact of residential and school mobility on student learning and developing new measures of school and classroom quality. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the recipient of the American Educational Research Association award for Distinguished contributions to educational research.


Ross Stolzenberg

Professor of Sociology and in the College

773-702-8685

Ross Stolzenberg is a demographer whose research career has focused on the development and empirical testing of social stratification theory, at aggregate and individual levels of analysis. This central interest has led him to a wide range of secondary, but strong subsidiary interests in more general demographic and sociological topics, including statistical methods, research design, work and employment, organizations, health and the family. But those interests all derive from his attempt to understand the process of stratification in industrialized societies.  Stolzenberg's primary current research is a set of efforts to understand institutional connections between the family, the labor market and the stratification of individuals. Ongoing projects measure the effect of husbands' and wives' paid and unpaid work on their own and each other's health, and, using historical judicial data, the effects of retirement on health and longevity.

Ross Stolzenberg's research has always focused on the development and testing of social stratification theory, at aggregate and individual levels of analysis. This central interest has led him to a wide range of secondary, but strong subsidiary interests in statistical methods, research design, employment, organizations, demography, employment, health and the family. Stolzenberg's primary current research is a set of efforts to understand and measure the effect of husbands' and wives' paid and unpaid work on their own and each other's health. He edits the journal Sociological Methodology for the American Sociological Association. - See more at: http://news.uchicago.edu/profile/ross-stolzenberg#sthash.hftaLUI1.dpuf

Kazuo Yamaguchi

Professor of Sociology

773-256-6234

Professor Yamaguchi is interested in statistical models for social data and mathematical models for social phenomena, the life course, rational choice, exchange networks, stratification and mobility, demography for family and employment, process of drug use progression. His current research focuses on models of exchange networks and women's occupational careers in Japanese society.